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Lexicon

The Lexicon

SIA’s Lexicon of Global Workforce-Related Terms is an essential guide to the various terminology and acronyms used within the staffing and workforce solutions ecosystem.

Introducing the lexicon

Introducing the lexicon

One of the major challenges facing contingent workforce program managers and staffing executives focused on this area is ensuring that a common language is used. A lack of common definitions can cause severe communication problems between program managers and suppliers or when benchmarking contingent workforce programs across organizations. To help alleviate the issue, SIA’s Global Lexicon of Workforce Terms suggests a set of definitions for the workforce solutions ecosystem to use.

Some of these terms are subject to some debate and there may be no common consensus around their use. In these cases, we have endeavoured to provide multiple definitions to clarify the issues. While we trust that the Lexicon will be useful in enabling a common understanding among parties, it is not meant to provide a complete set of legal or operating definitions. Although this is not an exhaustive dictionary of accounting and legal terms, we have included a number of such terms where they are particularly relevant to the staffing and HR industries.

Lexicon

The majority of terms are generic in nature and can be applied equally in The Americas; Europe, the Middle East & Africa (EMEA) and Asia Pacific (APAC); however, some terms are more regional in nature, and we indicate which these are with the identifying icons below. Our aim is not to provide a multi-language Lexicon but to provide insight into foreign terminology that is important in the wider global environment. We have retained the use of US-English spellings throughout the Lexicon (except where a term is relevant exclusively outside the US); however, it is prudent to familiarize yourself with common work-related variations between American and British English such as Call Center/Call Centre, Labor/Labour, Organization/Organisation, Program/Programme and Specialty/Speciality. English-users outside the US and UK tend to use both North American and UK spellings.

This is meant to be a living document. We encourage readers to suggest additional terms or to submit corrections and clarifications to the existing set of definitions. As we receive and compile new additions or clarify existing definitions, we will make quarterly updates to this Lexicon. If you have any corrections, clarifications or questions, please send them to us at [email protected]

Word of the Week

Word of the week

Direct Sourcing

North America

Direct Sourcing

A term commonly used to refer to the process by which a company leverages its own candidate pool (e.g., former employees, retirees, silver medalist applicants from its own ATS) to place within the company, as contingent/temporary employees. Direct Sourcing does not necessarily mean that 100% of a company’s hiring will be done in-house and with no relationships with intermediaries.

In earlier times, this practice for contingent workers largely consisted of informally sourced, pre-identified candidates who were placed on the payroll of a third-party payroll provider. More modern and mature direct sourcing programs typically leverage the employer brand in job advertising to maximize candidate flow.

More recently, the demand for Direct Sourcing has been accelerated by the evolution and multiplication of talent acquisition tools and services (aided by developments in artificial intelligence and big data). Such tools include software for managing and curating candidate talent pools.