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Global Daily News

  • Search firm Valent Mordan names former Kenexa partner as CEO

    Executive search firm Valent Mordan Inc. appointed John Valenti as the firm’s first CEO, effective March 20. Valenti is one of the founding partners of Valent Mordan and most recently served as managing partner.Prior to Valent Mordan, Valenti spent 17 years as a partner with Kenexa Corp., a Wayne, Penn.-based talent acquisition and management software and services firm. During that time, he led business units and oversaw the integration of several acquisitions. IBM acquired Kenexa in 2012 in a transaction valued at $1.3 billion.“Our company growth has created the need for a new organizational structure to accommodate our plans for growth and expansion,” said President and co-founder Michael Mordan. “This starts with a CEO. We are excited to have a proven winner, with a great track-record of success in the human capital management space.”Valent Mordan, launched in 2015, provides executive search and permanent placement across all verticals. It has two offices — headquarters in Dallas and operations out of Philadelphia — and 13 employees. […]

  • College-focused job board WayUp raises $18.5 million

    WayUp, a job board focused on US college students and recent grads, raised $18.5 million in a series B funding round led by Trinity ventures, the company announced Thursday. WayUp has raised $27.5 million since its founding in July 2014.The funding will go to the expansion of WayUp’s platform and services to recent grads while continuing to serve college students. It will also go to growing WayUp’s engineering team.“Over the next two years, WayUp is aiming to bring an entirely new level of personalization to our product using machine learning, in a way no platform has ever done before,” said CTO and co-founder JJ Fliegelman.Other investors in the funding round include General Catalyst, BoxGroup, Lerer-Hippeau Ventures, Index Ventures, SV Angel, Female Founders Fund, Axel Springer, CAA Ventures and OurCrowd. […]

  • Massachusetts staffing firm operators indicted for conspiracy, employment tax fraud, obstructing IRS

    Two owners of a Massachusetts temporary employment agency were indicted for conspiring to defraud the government, failing to pay over employment taxes and obstructing internal revenue laws, the US Department of Justice announced.Huong Le and Tien Chau allegedly cashed more than $11 million in client checks at a check cashing facility in Worcester, Mass., and used their staffing agency’s site supervisors, office manager and drivers to pay their employees in cash, according to the Department of Justice.The indictment said Le and Chau ran an employment agency that provided temporary labor to businesses in Massachusetts and New Hampshire. The agency operated under at least four different names: Central Boston Staffing Services, Metro Boston Staffing Services, General Staffing Inc. and Kim’s Staffing Inc. Le and Chau allegedly used family members and other individuals as nominees to conceal their ownership of the business.The indictment alleges that from 2006 through 2011, Le and Chau allegedly attempted to hide the size of their workforce from the IRS by paying most of their employees cash under the table and causing the filing of false employment tax returns that both underreported the number of their employees and did not report wages paid in cash. The indictment also charges that Le and Chau sought to obstruct an investigation by, among other things, directing an employee, after learning of her interview with special agents, to assist them with shredding the agency’s records. Le and Chau also allegedly destroyed and removed computer disks and computers from the business’s office.An indictment is not a finding of guilt. Individuals charged in indictments are presumed innocent until proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt.If convicted, Le and Chau face a statutory maximum sentence of five years in prison for the conspiracy and employment tax counts and three years in prison for obstructing the internal revenue laws. They also face a term of supervised release, restitution and monetary penalties. […]

  • Lowest jobless rate is in New Hampshire

    New Hampshire posted the lowest jobless rate among all states in February with an unemployment rate of 2.7%, the US Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Massachusetts and South Dakota followed closely at 2.8% each; Colorado and North Dakota were also low, both at 2.9%.New Mexico posted the highest jobless rate among states at 6.8%. It was followed by Alaska and Alabama with an unemployment rate of 6.4% and 6.2% respectively.Nevada posted the largest year-over-year decline in its unemployment rate in February, falling to 4.9% from 6.1% a year ago.The national unemployment rate in February was 4.7%, little changed from January but 0.2 percentage point lower than in February 2016. […]

  • France – Groupe Fed turnover up 14% in 2016

    Private French recruitment firm Groupe Fed announced a turnover of €69 million for the full year 2016, up 14% compared to the previous year."We are very pleased our turnover exceeded our growth objectives this year,” Alexandre Tamagnaud, co-founder of Groupe Fed, said. In 2016, the group’s distribution was 41% temporary workers and 59% CDI / CDD (permanent). Furthermore, in 2016 and early 2017 the group created the Fed Health (Sante Fed) and opened offices in Switzerland, Saint-Denis and Massy (with Fed Finance and Supply Fed).By the end of 2018, the group plans to create a new recruitment brand and continue its deployment in France and abroad. Established in 2001, Groupe Fed specialises in permanent and temporary staffing across 11 different brands. […]

  • UK – REC warns NHS staffing crisis will worsen due to new ban on agency staff

    NHS staffing shortages could get worse because of new measures to restrict trusts from hiring agency nurses and locum doctors who are also employed as substantive staff in the NHS, the Recruitment & Employment Confederation (REC) has warned.  Survey data from the REC shows that 199 healthcare recruitment businesses found that in 48% of agencies, more than half of the temporary nurses, doctors, and allied health professionals on their books are also employed substantively in the NHS.From 1April, trusts will no longer be able to turn to these professionals to fill gaps in rotas. The move is designed to encourage nurses and doctors to seek overtime shifts via internal NHS banks, rather than agencies.However, according to REC research, 77% of healthcare recruiters expect the candidates on their books to prioritise finding work in the private sector rather than the NHS in response to the ban. Moreover, 56% expect some nurses and doctors to stop working additional shifts in the NHS altogether. Meanwhile, 18% believe that some candidates will transfer to hospital banks for additional work. “The NHS is facing one of the worst ever staff shortages,” REC Chief Executive Kevin Green said. “The pay caps introduced last year have resulted in doctors and nurses choosing to work fewer shifts, go abroad, or to leave the sector altogether, meaning more gaps in rotas. Meanwhile, EU nurses are quitting in increasing numbers because the government has failed to provide any security about their future in the UK. This new ban will remove a lifeline and make a difficult situation worse.”Last month, REC research in partnership with the National Institute of Economic and Social Research (NIESR) found that substantive NHS staff are deterred from signing up to internal banks due to unreliable communication, old-fashioned payment procedures, poor management, and lack of professionalism in comparison to specialist agencies. “The Department of Health is putting savings before patient safety. NHS trusts up and down the country will not be able to cover shifts, putting patients at risk,” Green said. “Costs must be controlled, and the REC is committed to working with NHS Improvement to develop flexible staffing models that work for all parties,” Green said. “However, now is not the time to make it more difficult and less attractive for doctors and nurses to take on additional shifts.”Agency workers in the NHS accounted for 0.8% of the total NHS employment in 2015. […]

  • EU – Posted workers bill causes controversy amongst EU member states

    A new draft affecting workers temporarily sent to other EU countries is causing controversy between eastern and western member states, according to Euractiv.The new compromise bill, drafted by Malta, has explicitly referenced transport workers. However, opposing countries have argued that it is too hard to apply national employment law to truck drivers who pass through a country. The new draft also states that employers who send workers to other EU countries will also have to make sure their workers’ accommodation meets local standard conditions. The new bill has caused further divide among the EU member states.Last year, the European Commission proposed a revision vetoed ‘yellow cards’ from 11 countries that tried to block the changes last summer on grounds that it would harm the internal market. The rules allow workers to be sent temporarily to another EU country but still pay social contributions in their home countries.A group of countries including Poland, Romania and Hungary has opposed any legal changes to 21-year-old posted workers rules and called western EU member states protectionist for pushing measures to raise pay for workers from lower wage countries.Another meeting is set for Monday, 27 March in Malta that will discuss the draft bill. If there is still contention among the countries, then the issue will be handed over to ambassadors. […]

  • UK – Transline to face MPs again over use of agency workers

    UK employment agency Transline has been asked to appear before the Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy Committee and face questions from MPs regarding the use of agency workers by British companies.The employment agency, a member of the Recruitment and Employment Confederation (REC), was at the centre of a scandal and investigation involving Sports Direct.According to the Times, Jennifer Hardy, Transline’s financial director, is set to appear before the BEIS and will also update the committee about working conditions at Sports Direct’s Shirebrook warehouse.Transline was accused by a select committee inquiry of failing to have a “basic understanding of employment and practices” and giving “woefully poor and, in some cases, incorrect evidence” to MPs.Earlier this year, retailer Amazon cut ties with Transline. Furthermore, in January 2017, two brothers who recruited staff for Transline, which supplied Sports Direct, were convicted and jailed for six years each under the Modern Slavery Act. MPs have also previously urged Sports Direct boss Mike Ashley to cut ties with Transline. […]

  • World – Employee engagement declines for the first time since 2012

    Employee engagement has declined across the world for the first time since 2012 due to global uncertainty, according to data from HR business Aon Hewitt.Aon Hewitt analysed more than five million employees at more than 1,000 organizations around the world. The data showed that employee engagement dropped from 65%  in 2015 to 63% in 2016. The latest data shows less than one quarter (24%) of employees are highly engaged and 39% are moderately engaged.“The rise in populist movements like those in the US, the UK and other regions is creating angst within organisations as they anticipate the potential for a decrease in free labor flow,” Ken Oehler, Global Culture & Engagement Practice leader at Aon Hewitt, said. “Along with rapid advances in technology that are increasingly threatening job security, fewer employees are engaged and we expect this trend to continue.”“As engagement falls, businesses can expect greater turnover, higher absenteeism and lower customer satisfaction—all factors that will significantly contribute to poor financial performance,” Oehler said.Aon Hewitt research shows that a 5 point increase in employee engagement is linked to a 3 point increase in revenue growth in the subsequent year.Aon Hewitt’s analysis found regional variations in engagement were driven by regional and country-specific economic, political and cultural differences.According to Aon Hewitt, engagement for employees in Asia Pacific saw the biggest decline, dropping from 65% in 2015 to 62%  in 2016. Rewards and recognition programs were ranked as a top opportunity to improve engagement by employees in Asia.Latin America saw the largest increases in engagement, growing from 72% in 2015 to 75% in 2016. While not all countries in Latin America saw rising engagement levels, all countries remain above the global engagement rate. Mexico saw a 4% decline in engagement in 2016 while engagement for workers in Brazil rebounded eight points to 77% in 2016 after falling the previous year. Amidst the political and economic volatility and uncertainty in Venezuela, engagement was down 11 points to 69%. Latin America’s increase was followed by Africa which grew by 2%.North America showed a 1% decrease in engagement, while Europe fell by 2%.According to Aon, rewards and recognition ranked as the strongest engagement opportunity this year, an increase from ranking third in 2016.“Leaders should understand that this actually reflects employees’ perceptions of fairness. While organisations may not be able to make sweeping changes to compensation, it is important that they take steps to address these sentiments” Oehler said.Senior leadership strength and the degree of forward thinking decision-making was another top priority. “The ability for leaders to have the personal sensitivity required to lead people and their organizations to growth is paramount in this intensely changing environment,” Oehler said. […]

  • Asia Pacific – Female executives feel trapped in regional roles

    A majority of Asian women leaders at multinational corporations feel trapped in regional roles, according to a new study by executive search firm Heidrick & Struggles. The study, which gathered findings from 138 female senior Asian leaders in the APAC region, showed that 90% of Asian female senior leaders currently in regional roles in multinational companies with headquarters outside Asia aspire to be promoted to global roles. However, 36% are at least somewhat confident that they will be granted the opportunity. More than half, 54%, believe these barriers are a response to their ethnic background, while nearly half, 47%, feel that their gender is the main obstacle. Meanwhile, 85% are considering leaving their current companies in the next two years."Although there has been a focus on subjects such as women on boards and the development of the local female workforce, the research by Heidrick & Struggles reveals the difficulties of mid- to senior-level Asian female leaders who are limited to regional roles. This is the biggest glass ceiling issue that our successful female leaders are facing in this part of the world," Alain Deniau, Partner of Heidrick & Struggles based in Hong Kong, said."Visionary corporations that recognise the increasing importance of Asia to their business are relocating their global headquarters to Asia,” Karen Choy-Xavier, Partner of Heidrick & Struggles said. “This move by a handful of companies serves as a great opportunity for Asian female leaders to take on global responsibilities without juggling time zone differences or perceptions that they are below average performers just because of the foreign accent they display during midnight conference calls. This requires a shift in mentality for headquarters leaders and must align with performance appraisal systems that indicate the path to global roles.”Meanwhile, 43% of those polled are unwilling to take up global roles which would demand relocation, or participate in evening conference calls or other tasks that take away from time spent with their family. The study also showed that 19% feel that it is not culturally acceptable for women to be too ambitious, or that they would be regarded as culturally unfit by their colleagues at headquarters in terms of their communication styles. Moreover, 13% feel that it is their non-native English accent and lack of English language communication skills that hinder their progression while 48% agreed that a major barrier is that headquarters' leaders do not pay enough attention to developing Asian women. However, 4% cited lack of capabilities and skill sets as a barrier.“The firm's study reminds leaders at headquarters to take notice of Asian women leaders as an untapped resource for global roles,” Steve Mullinjer, Regional Leader of Heidrick & Struggles, Asia Pacific, said. "As leadership advisors, we recognise the pressing imperatives for companies to hire and promote the brightest and those with high potential in order to stay competitive and outperform others, regardless of their nationalities, age groups, gender and cultural backgrounds. Senior management or headquarters need to embed such diversity of thinking in their organisations' DNA to become truly diverse and inclusive organizations and drive better value to their stakeholders." […]

  • Taiwan – Jobless rate falls in February

    The unemployment rate in Taiwan fell to 3.85% in February, down 0.1% from the previous year, according to data from the Directorate General of Budget Accounting & Statistics.The number of unemployed persons was 453,000 in February 2017, which decreased by 9,000(-2.%) from the previous year.Total employment in February 2017 was 11,307,000, which increased by 76,000 (+0.68%) from that of the previous year.Taiwan’s labour force participation rate, which refers to number of people who are either employed or are actively looking for work, was 58.75% in February 2017, which increased by 0.09% from the previous year. […]

  • Singapore – Ministry of Manpower fines manufacturing firm for failing to pay its employees (Straits Times)

    Raycom Engineering & Aerospace, a manufacturing company based in Singapore has been fined by the Ministry of Manpower for failing to pay salaries to five of its employees, reports the Straits Times. MOM fined Raycom SGD 17,500 (USD 12,500). All five affected local workers recovered their salaries, which amounting to approximately SGD 30,000 (USD 21,430) plus corresponding Central Provident Fund contributions. MOM has also banned the company from employing foreign workers. […]

Latest Research

  • VMS Market Developments: Part 1

    Over the last few years, Vendor Management Systems (VMS) have been expanding functionality from primarily contingent worker sourcing and billing applications supporting workers sourced through staffing suppliers, to supporting workers sourced through services contracts (Statement of Work and Outsourced services) as well as significant improvement in analytics to support sourcing decisions and supplier management. More recently, and in line with the growth of the human cloud market as a new and growing source of contingent workers, VMS providers are developing integrations with Freelance Management Systems (FMS) or building their own FMS communities.Buyers can expect to see greater Applicant Tracking System (ATS) type functionality (candidate attraction, pooling, marketing and improved matching) and, therefore, better enabling of Total Talent Management concepts which will support a talent acquisition process across different worker types. Investments in ATS, Finance and HR integrations are also continuing and buyers can also expect more certified standard interfaces to be supported.SIA recognizes three distinct waves of VMS evolutionary waves: Wave 1.0: Supplier Centric Wave 2.0: Talent Centric Wave 3.0: Marketplace & Client Centric and Data Centric Click the link below to download the report: VMS Market Developments - Part 1 20170324 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • IT Recruiting Strategies

    The current economic expansion has fueled outsized growth in IT employment, leading to severe shortages of high-skilled tech workers. More restrictive immigration policies being pursued in the US and other Western nations is likely to further constrain the supply of talent. Job boards have become less effective channels for sourcing tech talent as the supply has continued to tighten. Reaching out to IT professionals in online communities where they naturally congregate can have better results, as can establishing a presence at tech events in local markets. Building relationships with universities and coding bootcamps is worthy of investigation, but each has its own limitations. It is critical to be highly selective when hiring recruiters. They must have both a strong grasp of IT concepts and the personal skills needed to communicate effectively with IT professionals. They will also need to have the right personality type in order to integrate well with the staffing firm’s culture. Develop and continually refine your recruiting process, integrating technology solutions to drive efficiency. Track metrics and benchmark against industry peers, using the data to identify and correct areas of weakness in process or personnel. Provide feedback to client employers in cases where their policies or procedures are negatively impacting their ability to attract talent. Candidate experience is central to referral and redeployment activity, which can amplify the effectiveness of a recruiting organization. Make the pre-hire and onboarding processes as painless as possible, and maintain regular contact with resources while the assignment is ongoing. Adoption of the bench model promotes retention, but should be applied selectively due to the inherent risks. To download a copy of the full report, please select the link below: Successful IT Recruiting Strategies 20170321 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • 4Q16 Results of Staffing Companies

    Key Findings: In our prior report (issued in December), deceleration in revenue growth was a dominant trend across publicly traded staffing companies doing business in North America. In this update, we see that deceleration generally morph into revenue declines. For the 22 companies in this report, their most recently reported quarterly revenue declined by a median 0.5% compared with the same period last year (y/y), down from 2.0% y/y growth for the previous quarter. While median revenue growth declined 0.5% y/y, we estimate a median decline of 0.3% once revenue is adjusted for acquisitions, currency exchange and in some cases divestitures and a difference in billing days between quarters. Generally, Q4 was a weak quarter for the US staffing market outside of a few pockets such as healthcare. Median gross margin for the quarter was also down y/y, by 20 basis points, as was median net income, by 15%. Net income in several cases was impacted by significant one-time events that may not reflect the ongoing operations of these companies. For further information, one can refer to the financial statements of the companies in this report. The table on page 4 lists financial information for the 22 companies, and is explained on page 3. Pages 5 and 6 compare revenue growth and net income with prior quarters. The full report can be downloaded by clicking the link below: Financial Results of Staffing Companies NA 4Q16 20170321 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • Workforce Solutions Buyers Survey 2016 - North America - Cumulative Report

    Key FindingsThis 498-page report comprises both the 2016 Workforce Solutions Buyers Survey results and relevant information from previous editions of this survey, going back to 2009. A few examples of information you will find in our report are: Contingent share of workforce: Organizations reported a median 20% and average (mean) 22% contingent share of their total workforce. On average companies reported the following proportions of their contingent workforce: agency temporary workers (50%), statement-of-work (SOW) consultants (30%), independent contractors (11%), internal temporary workers (7%) and other (3%). Temp-to-perm conversion rate: The median temp-to-perm conversion rate was 10%. Use of supplier management strategies: 72% of companies reported use of a VMS, while 58% indicated use of an MSP. Top priorities of contingent workforce programs: The most selected top priorities were reducing/controlling costs (16%), providing excellent customer service to internal stakeholders (15%) and globally integrating the contingent workforce program (15%). Internal resources dedicated to contingent workforce management: The median team size was 3 full-time equivalents. 67% of respondents reported that they spent at least half of their time on contingent workforce related responsibilities. Performance rating of contingent workforce program: 83% of respondents rated the performance of their contingent workforce program as either average, above average, or excellent. Satisfaction with staffing supplier, VMS, and MSP: On a scale of 1 to 10 (with 10 equal to “very likely”), we asked organizations whether they would recommend their staffing supplier, VMS, and MSP. The average responses were 7.30 for staffing supplier, 6.98 for VMS, and 6.86 for MSP. MSP and VMS cost savings: 83% of respondents reported use of an MSP resulted in some savings, significant savings, or huge savings. 77% of respondents indicated use of a VMS resulted in some savings, significant savings, or huge savings. Recruitment process outsourcing (RPO): Among companies that reported use of RPO, 77% indicated that RPO has brought about a decrease in their average time-to-fill for permanent positions. Trends in online staffing and freelancer management systems (FMS): 65% of companies reported familiarity with online staffing and 12% reported use of online staffing. 56% of companies indicated familiarity with FMS while 6% reported use of FMS. To download the report, please select the following link: Workforce Solutions Buyers Survey 2016 - North America - Cumulative Report 20170318 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • Staffing Firm Use of Satisfaction Surveys

    Key Findings: This report is based on responses to the following survey question: “What survey (if any) do you use to measure the satisfaction of internal staff and/or temporary workers? We don't formally survey internal staff/temporary worker satisfaction An internally-generated survey A survey from a non-SIA vendor SIA's ‘Best Place to Work For’ Survey” Internal staff Sixty-nine percent of staffing firms survey internal staff regarding work satisfaction. In terms of survey method, 44% percent of staffing firms survey internal staff directly, through an internally-generated survey, 20% survey using a non-SIA vendor, and 5% use the SIA “Best Place to Work For” survey. The remaining 31% of staffing firms do not survey internal staff at all regarding work satisfaction. Temporary workers Sixty-eight percent of staffing firms likewise survey temporary staff regarding work satisfaction. In terms of survey method, 63% of staffing firms survey temporary workers directly, through an internally-generated survey, and 5% survey using a non-SIA vendor. The remaining 32% of staffing firms do not survey temporary workers at all regarding work satisfaction. To access the complete report, please select the link below: Europe Staffing Company Survey 2016 Internal Staff and Temporary Worker Satisfaction Surveys XX029 20170324 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • VMS Market Developments: Part 1

    Over the last few years, Vendor Management Systems (VMS) have been expanding functionality from primarily contingent worker sourcing and billing applications supporting workers sourced through staffing suppliers, to supporting workers sourced through services contracts (Statement of Work and Outsourced services) as well as significant improvement in analytics to support sourcing decisions and supplier management. More recently, and in line with the growth of the human cloud market as a new and growing source of contingent workers, VMS providers are developing integrations with Freelance Management Systems (FMS) or building their own FMS communities.Clients can expect to see greater Applicant Tracking System (ATS) type functionality (candidate attraction, pooling, marketing and improved matching) and, therefore, better enabling of Total Talent Management concepts which will support a talent acquisition process across different worker types. Investments in ATS, Finance and HR integrations are also continuing and buyers can also expect more certified standard interfaces to be supported. SIA recognizes three distinct waves of VMS evolutionary waves: Wave 1.0: Supplier Centric Wave 2.0: Talent Centric Wave 3.0: Marketplace & Client Centric and Data Centric Click the link below to download the report:  VMS Market Developments - Part 1 20170324 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • Temp-to-hire fees | Direct hire fees

    Key Findings: This report is based on responses to the following four survey questions: “On average, what is the percent of salary your company charges for a direct hire/permanent placement?” “Please give the following approximate metrics for your staffing firm... Of placed temps, percent that convert to permanent positions Average temp-to-hire conversion fee (% of salary)” “When you charge a conversion fee for a temp-to-hire requisition how do you calculate the fee? (Select the one policy closest to your own.)” “If a temporary worker you have placed converts to permanent status, at what juncture of completed service for that worker do you no longer charge a temp-to-hire conversion fee?” Median direct hire and temp-to-hire fees reported by staffing firms were 20% of salary and 15% of salary, respectively. The median reported percent of temporary workers who ultimately convert to a permanent position was 10%. Two-thirds of staffing firms use one of two methods to calculate temp-to-hire conversion fees, either “a sliding scale based upon discount applied after they work a certain period of time,” or “a fixed percent of salary.” An additional 21% of staffing firms set fees on a case-by-case basis, 10% use a sliding fee scale based upon higher percentage at higher levels of salary, and 3% use a fixed dollar or euro fee. Sixty-four percent of staffing firms forego conversion fees after a temporary worker completes a specified number of days or hours on assignment.  To access the complete report, please select the link below: Europe Staffing Company Survey 2016 Temp-to-hire conversion rates, fees, and policies & Direct hire fees XX027 20170323 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • IT Recruiting Strategies

    The current economic expansion has fueled outsized growth in IT employment, leading to severe shortages of high-skilled tech workers. More restrictive immigration policies being pursued in the US and other Western nations is likely to further constrain the supply of talent. Job boards have become less effective channels for sourcing tech talent as the supply has continued to tighten. Reaching out to IT professionals in online communities where they naturally congregate can have better results, as can establishing a presence at tech events in local markets. Building relationships with universities and coding bootcamps is worthy of investigation, but each has its own limitations. It is critical to be highly selective when hiring recruiters. They must have both a strong grasp of IT concepts and the personal skills needed to communicate effectively with IT professionals. They will also need to have the right personality type in order to integrate well with the staffing firm’s culture. Develop and continually refine your recruiting process, integrating technology solutions to drive efficiency. Track metrics and benchmark against industry peers, using the data to identify and correct areas of weakness in process or personnel. Provide feedback to client employers in cases where their policies or procedures are negatively impacting their ability to attract talent. Candidate experience is central to referral and redeployment activity, which can amplify the effectiveness of a recruiting organization. Make the pre-hire and onboarding processes as painless as possible, and maintain regular contact with resources while the assignment is ongoing. Adoption of the bench model promotes retention, but should be applied selectively due to the inherent risks. To download a copy of the full report, please select the link below:  Successful IT Recruiting Strategies 20170321 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • Staffing Firm Use of Satisfaction Surveys

    Key Findings: This report is based on responses to the following survey question: “What survey (if any) do you use to measure the satisfaction of internal staff and/or temporary workers? We don't formally survey internal staff/temporary worker satisfaction An internally-generated survey A survey from a non-SIA vendor SIA's ‘Best Place to Work For’ Survey” Internal staff Fifty-four percent of staffing firms survey internal staff regarding work satisfaction. In terms of survey method, 43% of staffing firms survey internal staff directly, through an internally-generated survey, and 11% survey using a non-SIA vendor. The remaining 46% of staffing firms do not survey internal staff at all regarding work satisfaction. Temporary workers Sixty-one percent of staffing firms likewise survey temporary staff regarding work satisfaction. In terms of survey method, 47% of staffing firms survey temporary workers directly, through an internally-generated survey, and 14% survey using a non-SIA vendor. The remaining 39% of staffing firms do not survey temporary workers at all regarding work satisfaction. To access the complete report, please select the link below: AustraliaNZ Staffing Company Survey 2016 Staff Satisfaction Surveys XX030 20170324 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • Workforce Solutions Buyers Survey 2016 - Asia Pacific - Cumulative Report

    Key FindingsThis report comprises both the 2016 Workforce Solutions Buyers Survey results and information from previous editions of this survey, going back to 2014. A few examples of the research findings you will find in our latest survey are: Contingent share of workforce: Organizations reported a median 20% and average (mean) 24% contingent share of their total workforce. On average, companies reported the following proportions of their contingent workforce: agency temporary workers (42%), statement-of-work (SOW) consultants (38%), independent contractors (14%), internal temporary workers (5%) and other (2%). Temp-to-perm conversion rate: The median temp-to-perm conversion rate was 8%. Use of supplier management strategies: 70% of companies reported use of a VMS, while 61% indicated use of an MSP. Top priorities of contingent workforce programs: The most selected top priorities were providing excellent customer service to internal stakeholders (19%), global integration (17%) and reducing/controlling costs (17%). Internal resources dedicated to contingent workforce management: The median team size was 5 full-time equivalents. 69% of respondents reported that they spent at least half of their time on contingent workforce related responsibilities. Performance rating of contingent workforce program: 85% of respondents rated the performance of their contingent workforce program as either average, above average, or excellent. Satisfaction with staffing supplier, VMS, and MSP: On a scale of 0 to 10 (with 10 equal to “very likely”), we asked organizations whether they would recommend their staffing supplier, VMS, and MSP. The average responses were 7.00 for staffing supplier, 7.20 for VMS, and 7.38 for MSP. MSP and VMS cost savings: 88% of respondents reported use of an MSP resulted in some savings, significant savings, or huge savings. 85% of respondents indicated use of a VMS resulted in some savings, significant savings, or huge savings. Recruitment process outsourcing (RPO): 33% of companies using RPO indicated that they use RPO for 10% or less of their total permanent hires, while another 7% of companies used RPO for 11-20% of their hires. On the other end of the spectrum, 47% of companies used RPO for a majority of their permanent hiring.  Trends in online staffing and freelancer management systems (FMS): 78% of companies reported familiarity with online staffing and 12% reported use of online staffing. 75% of companies indicated familiarity with FMS while 20% reported use of FMS To download the report, please select the following link: Workforce Solutions Buyers Survey 2016 - Asia Pacific - Cumulative Report 2017.03.24 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • VMS Market Developments: Part 1

    Over the last few years, Vendor Management Systems (VMS) have been expanding functionality from primarily contingent worker sourcing and billing applications supporting workers sourced through staffing suppliers, to supporting workers sourced through services contracts (Statement of Work and Outsourced services) as well as significant improvement in analytics to support sourcing decisions and supplier management. More recently, and in line with the growth of the human cloud market as a new and growing source of contingent workers, VMS providers are developing integrations with Freelance Management Systems (FMS) or building their own FMS communities.Clients can expect to see greater Applicant Tracking System (ATS) type functionality (candidate attraction, pooling, marketing and improved matching) and, therefore, better enabling of Total Talent Management concepts which will support a talent acquisition process across different worker types. Investments in ATS, Finance and HR integrations are also continuing and buyers can expect more certified standard interfaces to be supported.SIA recognizes three distinct waves of VMS evolutionary waves: Wave 1.0: Supplier Centric Wave 2.0: Talent Centric Wave 3.0: Marketplace & Client Centric and Data Centric Click the link below to download the report: VMS Market Developments - Part 1 20170324 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • Temp-to-hire fees | Direct hire fees

    Key Findings: This report is based on responses to the following four survey questions: “On average, what is the percent of salary your company charges for a direct hire/permanent placement?” “Please give the following approximate metrics for your staffing firm... Of placed temps, percent that convert to permanent positions Average temp-to-hire conversion fee (% of salary)” “When you charge a conversion fee for a temp-to-hire requisition how do you calculate the fee? (Select the one policy closest to your own.)” “If a temporary worker you have placed converts to permanent status, at what juncture of completed service for that worker do you no longer charge a temp-to-hire conversion fee?” Median direct hire and temp-to-hire fees reported by staffing firms were 13% of salary and 10% of salary, respectively. The median reported percent of temporary workers who ultimately convert to a permanent position was 20%. Forty-one percent of staffing firms calculate temp-to-hire conversion fees using “a sliding scale based upon discount applied after they work a certain period of time.” An additional 21% of staffing firms set fees on a case-by-case basis, 16% use a fixed percent of salary, 11% use a sliding fee scale based upon higher percentage at higher levels of salary, and 11% use a fixed dollar or euro fee. Seventy-seven percent of staffing firms forego conversion fees after a temporary worker completes a specified number of days or hours on assignment.  To access the complete report, please select the link below: AUS Staffing Company Survey 2016 Temp-to-hire conversion rates, fees, and policies & Direct hire fees XX028 20170323 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]