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Randstad: Challenges similar for younger, older workers

June 26 2013

Most Americans and Canadians believe it is harder for both younger and older workers to find a suitable job, according to findings from Randstad’s latest Global Workmonitor survey.

Sixty-four percent of U.S. respondents and 86 percent of Canadian respondents agreed with the statement, “I believe it is hard for young people (aged 25 or younger) to find suitable job.” And 87 percent of U.S. respondents and 89 percent of Canadian respondents agreed with the statement, “I believe it is hard for older people (aged 55 or older) to find a suitable job.”

Additionally, respondents felt that both younger and older workers would be willing to accept work below their education levels. Ninety percent of U.S. respondents and 86 percent of Canadian respondents agreed that young workers would be willing to accept work below their education levels. Eighty-three percent in the U.S. and 77 percent in Canada agreed older workers would be willing to accept work below their education levels.

“In an increasingly competitive market, companies may be hesitant to make the larger investments in more experienced workers; or smaller investments in those who are untested,” said Jan Hein Bax, president, Randstad Canada. “But as the labour market faces impending skills shortages, companies need to invest in training the new generation of workers to replace those skilled workers that will soon leave. They also need experienced workers who can act as mentors and help facilitate the integration of young employees.”

The Randstad Workmonitor study is conducted online among a population aged 18-65, working a minimum of 24 hours a week in a paid job (not self-employed). The minimal sample size is 400 interviews per country and the second wave of 2013 was conducted between April 18 and May 3, 2013.

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Spaceman Eddie 06/27/2013 03:01 pm

"Suitable" is in the eyes of the buyers and sellers, like "price". It's about the buyer and seller meeting each others' needs.

What we have is a valuation problem. Candidates who have tangible assets and minimal perceived liabilities have a high worth and are getting offers.

With the cost and risks of hiring ever increasing, the market is unforgiving of candidates whose perceived liabilities exceed their assets, or those who haven't even objectively considered their self-valuation.

It's unfortunate, but the job market matches the statement made by ex-NFL coach Dennis Mitchell: "We are what the record says we are."


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