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Global Daily News

  • Global sharing economy revenue to triple by 2020, report says

    Sharing economy platform providers, such as Uber, Airbnb and TaskRabbit, will see revenue triple to $20.4 billion by 2020 from $6.4 billion in 2015, according to Juniper Research’s report, “Sharing Economy: Opportunities, Impacts, and Disruptors 2016-2020.”While a number of industries have already been affected by the sharing economy, other core markets will see significant disruption over the next few years, according to Juniper. For example, providers of shared personal services such as TaskRabbit, Airtasker and the Japanese platform Anytimes will see their time-saving solutions prove popular with consumers striving to maintain a healthy “work-life balance.”Juniper also believes that a number of smaller and emerging shared economy industries are primed for significant growth over the coming 10 years, namely the shared delivery and manufacturing sectors, and reports it has already witnessed large players in both the technology industry, and the shared economy itself, branching into these emerging sectors.Shared manufacturing is one such emerging industry backed by major players, with significant scope for growth and development, according to Juniper.“GM already operates its FirstBuild platform, utilizing the concept of collaborative innovation, with a number of projects already completed and shipped to consumers,” said research author Lauren Foye. “Other providers, such as TechShop, enable access to technologically advanced workshops, reducing the production times for prototypes and concepts, whilst aiding in the scaling-up of production projects designed by young start-up businesses.”The report also cites Uber’s launch of its UberRUSH local delivery service, as well as UberEATS, which utilizes freelance drivers to deliver food, disrupting the logistics sector. UberEATS recently launched in Melbourne, Australia, bringing the total number of cities in which it is available across the globe to 13, with plans to continue expansion throughout 2016. […]

  • Four to five weeks to fill finance jobs, Robert Half CFO survey says

    It takes four weeks, on average, to fill an open staff-level accounting or finance position and five weeks to hire for a management-level role, according to a survey of CFOs released today by Robert Half Finance & Accounting.“With the talent shortage in today’s finance and accounting hiring market, employers who accelerate the hiring process put themselves ahead of the competition,” said Paul McDonald, senior executive director at Robert Half. “Companies must allocate time to properly vet candidates with thorough interviews and reference checks, but taking too long to make a decision can cause employers to lose the most in-demand candidates.”McDonald added that acting swiftly to extend a job offer is especially critical for recruiting candidates who have specialized finance and accounting skills, certifications and credentials, such as a CPA license or MBA degree.CFOs were asked, “On average, how many weeks does it typically take to hire for an open staff-level accounting or finance position?” The mean response was four weeks.CFOs were also asked, “On average, how many weeks does it typically take to hire for an open management-level accounting or finance position?” The mean response was five weeks.The survey was developed by Robert Half Finance & Accounting and conducted by an independent research firm. It is based on telephone interviews with more than 2,200 CFOs from companies in more than 20 of the largest US metropolitan areas. […]

  • Distribution of temps uneven across states

    The distribution of employees hired by staffing agencies is uneven across states, according to a report in The Wall Street Journal that analyzes US Department of Labor data. In South Carolina, one in 25 workers is a temp, the highest share in the country, and other southern states have a relatively high portion of staffing-agency workers. Conversely, temps make up a smaller share of the workforce in less-populated states. Just 0.4% of all workers are temps in Alaska, and fewer than one in 100 workers are temps in South Dakota, Wyoming and Hawaii. Pay for these workers tends to be better in states where they make up a smaller share of the labor force.&nbs […]

  • Report says billions in gig economy taxes going unreported

    A study being delivered to Congress says billions of dollars in taxable income may be going unreported each year because the IRS has been so slow to adapt to the peer-to-peer economy, Bloomberg reported. More than 2.5 million Americans earned income via on-demand platforms like Airbnb Inc., Etsy Inc. and Lyft Inc. in 2014, and the companies generated an estimated $15 billion in revenue, according to the report. But the companies don’t withhold taxes on the income they pay to people who provide services or sell items via their platforms. […]

  • Global – Millennials prioritise job security and the opportunity for new challenges

    According to a new report from ManpowerGroup, Millennial Careers: 2020 Vision, Millennials prioritise job security and the opportunity for new challenges.The report, which was based on a worldwide study of 19,000 millennials from 25 countries, shows that, by 2020, Millennials will make up over a third of the global workforce.Job security is critical for Millennials, but they define it differently with 27% saying that it means a secure job for the long-term and another 27% saying having job skills that match market needs. The report states that Millennials have redefined job security as career security. Globally, Millennial workplace priorities vary, but the majority state that purpose is a priority. Working with great people is important to 91% in Brazil, yet to only 55% in Japan. Retirement policies matter to 39% of Japanese and half of Australians, in contrast with more than 85% of Indians. Purpose matters too; 8 in 10 Millennials in Mexico, India and Brazil say working for employers who are socially responsible and aligned to their values is important. In Germany, the Netherlands and Norway it’s 6 in 10.Millennials are surprisingly upbeat about their careers with 62% of respondents confident that if they lost their main source of income tomorrow they could find equally good or better work within three months. Overall, Millennials in Mexico, China, Switzerland and Germany are the most positive, while those in Japan, Greece and Italy are the least positive—a reflection of economic, political and cultural factors in these countries. The majority of Millennials globally see a promising future and successful careers ahead.Millennials are also preparing to run career ‘ultramarathons’. Over half expect to work past age 65, while 27% expect to work over the age of 70, and 12% say they will likely work until the day they die. In Japan, that figure is at 37%, the highest, while Spain is the lowest at 3%.Furthermore, Millennials are working longer and harder than previous generations, with 84% of Millennials foreseeing career breaks taking longer than four weeks. Though women are likely to plan breaks to care for others — children, older relatives, etc. — men and women prioritise leisure-related breaks for themselves equally. As far as a typical workweek is concerned, 73% report working more than 40 hours a week, and nearly a quarter work over 50 hours. Indian Millennials claim the longest working week and Australians the shortest – on average 52 and 41 hours a week respectively. Meanwhile, 26% globally are working two or more paid jobs.The research also shows that Millennials are happy to disrupt and be disrupted by new ways of working. While almost three-quarters of working Millennials are in full-time jobs today, over half say they’re open to new ways of working in the future - freelance, gig work or portfolio careers with multiple jobs and 34% globally are considering self-employment.Moreover, 93% of Millennials are willing to spend their own time and/or money on further training. The report highlights the positive correlation between people’s career success—being more educated, better prepared for employment and higher paid—and their “learnability,” or ability and desire to learn.“Employers need to listen up and get creative. They simply cannot afford not to appeal to Millennials,” Mara Swan, Executive Vice President, Global Strategy and Talent, ManpowerGroup and Global Brand Lead for Right Management, said. “Millennials want progression, but that doesn't have to mean promotion. We need new ways to motivate and engage employees, like facilitating on-the-job learning and helping people move around the organisation to gain experience more easily. And what works for Millennials works for the rest of the workforce too.&rdquo […]

  • UK – Generation Z jobseekers believe employers are not doing enough to attract them

    According to a study from Capita Resourcing, a UK-based provider of business process outsourcing solutions and professional services, 71% of 16-20 year olds believe that employers are not making enough effort to attract them, despite a quarter (28%) of organisations reporting that they proactively recruit this age group.The study, ‘A to Gen Z research’, examined the attitudes of 1,015 Generation Z-ers (aged between 16 and 20) and 106 senior HR professionals. It revealed a shift in power from employers to candidates, with the large majority (62%) of Gen Z believing that an interview is as much about interviewing a prospective employer as it is about the employer interviewing them.The study also found that 59% of employers think Gen Z workers will leave very quickly if their organisations don’t adequately accommodate and support Gen Z individuals who are starting their first job. However many employers aren’t anticipating this generation’s need to feel wanted, or just how long they plan to stay in an organisation for. In fact, over half (54%) of Gen Z stated they only expect to stay in their first job for under two years. This translates into an average expectancy of just 500 working days for a Gen Z employee in their first role.“To maximise the potential of Generation Z, organisations need to better understand the needs, ambitions and expectations of this cohort in the workplace,” Nicola McQueen, Managing Director, Capita HR & Resourcing, said. “Particularly in terms of their unwillingness to stay in a company for longer than the 500 day window highlighted in our research.”According to the research, most respondents want stability in their role (93%), to work for a well-known company (82%), a challenge (80%) and work that makes a difference/impacts society (79%). The research also found that Gen Z-ers want clear direction (72%), transparency (67%) and trust (66%) from their managers.When it comes to ways of working, working face-to-face in a small team (54%) was favoured over virtually/remotely (32%) or face-to-face in large teams (14%). Moreover, good opportunities to progress within a company (93%), good opportunities to develop as person (93%), time off to study (47%) plus a mentor/coach at work (45%) were preferable amongst Generation Z. […]

  • UK – More than half of graduates would vote to remain in the EU

    According to UK-based graduate jobs site, Prospects, 57% of UK graduates would vote to remain in EU, while 14% would opt to exit.The study, which polled 453 graduates, also showed that 41% of respondents agreed that leaving the EU would have a negative impact on their career, but 37% said they lacked information to have an opinion. Just one in ten graduates said leaving the EU wouldn’t make any difference to their careers.When asked about the potential impact leaving the EU would have on any further study plans, 31% agreed it would have a negative impact while a quarter said they lacked information. Twenty three percent said that they didn’t think leaving the EU would have any impact on their study plans.Excluding those yet to decide whether to vote, a resounding 86% of respondents plan to vote on the 23 June 2016. The polls all point to a very close contest, but here we can see that younger people are backing a vote to remain,” Mike Hill, chief executive at Prospects said. “They believe an exit from the EU would narrow their options. Options, ironically, which their parents and grandparents have benefited from over the last 40 years.“A lack of information is clearly a barrier to decision-making, but the information is available. Graduates need to take the time to educate themselves, to really think about the potential impact a Brexit would have on their careers and options in life,” Hill said.The EU Referendum takes place on 23 June 2016. […]

  • UK – London only surpassed by Silicon Valley for tech innovation

    London has surpassed both New York and Shanghai and is now second, behind San Francisco in a global ranking of most likely city in the world to create the next big tech giant, according to Ernst and Young’s annual Attractiveness Survey.The survey interviewed over 440 international companies, which were asked which three cities offer the best chance of producing the next tech-giant, with investors naming London, second to San Francisco/Silicon Valley (up from fourth in 2015).“The finding that London has overtaken New York as a top tech city is great news for companies with a presence in the capital,” Regina Moran, CEO of Fujitsu UK & Ireland, said. “This news reflects the fact that London has a highly diverse body of great talent, which is vital for companies to be creative and succeed. The long term success of any organisation in the fast-moving field of technology depends on both access to highly-skilled individuals and a diverse workforce who can bring in fresh perspectives, ideas and values. When everyone comes from the same background businesses can become stilted, in the same way that a mixture of complementary skills are needed to produce interesting results. On top of that, a lack of diversity can stunt a business’ ability to communicate effectively with its broad range of clients and customers. The mixture of skills and backgrounds in London provides the perfect environment for technology companies like Fujitsu to innovate, and therefore it’s no surprise that the city is now the second highest ranked tech city in the world.”The survey showed the 23% of investors chose London, meanwhile 29% chose San Francisco while Shanghai (21%), New York (16%), Beijing (14%) and Berlin (10%) rounded out the rest of the top choices. […]

  • Australia – Fircroft acquires One Key Resources

    UK-based engineering recruitment company Fircroft has acquired Australian firm One Key Resources, a specialist provider of labour hire and managed workforce services to the mining, oil and gas, and infrastructure industries.“One Key are leading the market in workforce solutions for the mining and natural resources industries. With their continual focus on providing a best-in-class service to clients and contractors alike, One Key are perfectly aligned to the values of the Fircroft Group,” Fircroft CEO, Johnathan Johnson, said.“At Fircroft we have ambitious expansion plans, and we are pleased that One Key, with their suite of innovative, market-leading training products and workforce solutions will be joining us on this journey as we seek to further strengthen our expertise in providing workforce solutions to the global mining industry.”“One Key has seen phenomenal growth and success in recent years with consistent increases in revenue and our total workforce,” Grant Wechsel, Co-Founder and Managing Director of One Key Resources, said. “As part of the Fircroft Group we will be in a strong position to take our innovative solutions to a global market.”“In joining the Fircroft Group, One Key is becoming part of a business that shares our relentless commitment to innovation, quality and the achievement of the highest levels of client and contractor satisfaction.”Financial details of the transaction were not disclosed. […]

  • India – Teamlease revenue up across the board

    Indian staffing firm Teamlease Services (TEAMLEASE:NSI) reported revenue for the fourth quarter ending 31 March 2016 of INR 6.64 billion (USD 98.5 million). An increase of 25.5% compared with INR 5.29 billion (USD 78.5 million) during the same quarter last year.   Q4 2016 USD Q4 2015 USD Change Revenue INR 6.64 billion USD 98.5 million INR 5.29 billion USD 78.5 million 25.5% Net Profit INR 91.4 billion USD 1.35 million INR 68.0 billion USD 1.0 million 34.4% EBITDA INR 83.83 million USD 1.24 million INR 83.36 million USD 1.23 million 0.5% "We have witnessed another good year with a revenue growth of 25% consistent with our past track record. This growth has been driven by robust performances across all verticals," TeamLease Services Managing Director Ashok Reddy said. Teamlease’s total client base increased from 1,200+ in FY2015 to 1,400+ in FY2016 spreading across all industries and verticals. Their top 5 and top 10 clients contribute to about 13% and 17% of our net revenue respectively, implying a well-diversified mix of client portfolio.The company’s apprenticeship program, launched through TeamLease Education Foundation (TLEF), crossed 16,000 apprentice enrolments during FY2016 of which about 4,000 trainees have been certified during the year, leaving a year-end number of about 11,500 trainees.On Feburary 2016, Teamlease opened its IPO at a premium, raising INR 1.9 billion (USD 28 million). A total of 10,000 shares had been reserved for the company's employees in the public issue. The proceeds of the IPO were planned for acquisitions and other strategic initiatives, upgradation of the existing IT infrastructure, working capital requirements and other general corporate purposes.The company operates four primary business segments: Staffing Operations, Recruitment Operations, Training Operations and Unallocated.   Q4 2016 USD Q4 2015 USD Change Staffing Operations INR 6.54 billion USD 97.0 million INR 5.21 billion USD 77.3 million 25.5% Recruitment Operations INR 39.2 million USD 581,900 INR 38.3 million USD 568,524 2.3% Training Operations INR 24.0 million USD 356,056 INR 21.4 million USD 317,660 12.6% Unallocated INR 38.1 million USD 565,240 INR 17.7 million USD 262,746 115.2% Total INR 6.64 billion USD 98.5 million INR 5.29 billion USD 78.5 million 25.5% According to research from Staffing Industry Analysts, Teamlease is the second largest staffing firm operating in India. "We continue to believe in the large addressable market opportunities and towards that, have made considerable investments during the year in technology, people and leadership to harness the future potential," Reddy said.TeamLease Services Ltd (TEAMLEASE:NSI) traded at INR 924.00 (USD 13.70), up 2.51% on the day and 14.55% above the 52 week low of INR 806.65 (USD 11.97) set on 12 February 2016. Based on its current share price the company has a market value of INR 15.99 billion (USD 237.2 million). […]

  • Singapore – Ministry of Manpower and Tripartite partners revise guidelines on managing excess manpower and responsible retrenchment

    The Ministry of Manpower (MOM) in Singapore, along with its tripartite partners, the Singapore National Employers Federation and the National Trades Union Congress, have revised the Tripartite Guidelines on Managing Excess Manpower and Responsible Retrenchment.According to MOM, the Singapore economy is highly exposed to global trends and companies often find that they have to restructure to stay competitive. As businesses adjust, they should consider alternative ways of managing their excess manpower such as upskilling employees and redesigning jobs. However, if retrenchment is inevitable, companies should do so in a responsible manner. The Tripartite Guidelines emphasises the need for companies to maintain a strong Singaporean Core and avenues to help workers who have been displaced.“As companies restructure in their efforts to raise productivity as well as amidst slower growth, organisational rightsizing will be necessary and some redundancies may be unavoidable,” Koh Juan Kiat, SNEF's Executive Director, said. If retrenching is inevitable, employers should do so responsibly and render the necessary assistance to their workers.”“As local workforce growth is expected to grow by only 1.0% per annum until 2020, we urge employers to take a longer term view of their manpower needs and make efforts towards strengthening their competencies and maintaining a strong Singaporean core. These will enable their companies to seize growth opportunities quickly once their business rebounds," Kiat said.“We believe the revised tripartite guidelines will help companies better manage their excess manpower in a more effective manner during difficult times,” Cham Hui Fong, NTUC Assistant Secretary-General, said. “Companies should send their workers for skills upgrading so that workers remain relevant and adaptable. While retrenchment may sometimes be inevitable, companies should conduct the retrenchment exercise in a fair and sensitive manner. Unionised companies should inform their unions earlier on any impending retrenchment and work with unions closely to ensure that fair retrenchment packages are offered and displaced workers are assisted with proper outplacement services.”MOM will also investigate complaints of discriminatory employment practices, including retrenchments that unfairly target Singaporeans, or which result in Singaporeans being replaced with foreigners. If the complaints are substantiated, companies may have their work pass privileges curtailed. […]

  • India – Government to proceed on labour reforms

    In the face of growing protest from workers and the middle class, the Union labour ministry on Tuesday indicated it will go slow on labour reforms and changed the narrative of labour reform from employer-centric to employee-centric, reports the economictimes.indiatimes.com. "With this new mode of functioning I hope a more conducive environment will be created in the future which in turn creates more jobs. The focus of labour reforms of this government is to ensure social security and minimum wages for unorganised workers, help in creation of good quality jobs besides providing job security to all workers," Labour minister labour minister Bandaru Dattatreya said. […]

Latest Research

  • May 2016 Financial Results

    Key Findings: Of the 23 publicly traded companies included in this report, revenue generated from each company’s most recently reported quarter rose by a median 6.0% compared with the same period last year. Adjusted for acquisitions (by either excluding the acquired business from both current and prior periods or by including it in both periods, depending on information available), currency exchange and in some cases divestitures and a difference in billing days between quarters, median growth was 4.0%. The table on page 3 lists financial information for the 23 companies. The table is explained on page 2. The rising US dollar is now having less of an impact on year-over-year revenue growth than it had in the last few quarterly reports, as much of the rise in the dollar has anniversaried. AMN Healthcare posted the highest year-over-year (y/y) adjusted revenue growth for the quarter among the 23 companies in this report. The company also reported the highest adjusted growth in our reports issued in March and December for the prior two quarters. Heidrick & Struggles and Korn/Ferry both grew revenue by double digits, indicative of the strength in the retained search market. Median gross margin for the latest quarter increased y/y by 20 basis points. 59% of companies reported positive growth in net income over the same period. However, net income in several cases was impacted by significant one-time events that may not reflect the ongoing operations of these companies. For further information, one can refer to the financial statements of the companies in this report. This report provides the same information for Korn/Ferry and Volt Information Sciences as did the prior report, due to the timing of the fiscal quarters of those companies. For the full report, click below: Financial Results of Staffing Companies NA 1Q16 20160524 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • What Drives Temp Satisfaction

    Key Findings: Over 5,000 temporary workers from seventy-five staffing firms responded to the question “How likely is it that you would recommend your primary staffing supplier/agency to a friend or colleague?” The aggregate net promoter score (NPS) based on these responses was 39%, slightly lower than that reported in 2015 (47%), 2014 (42%), 2013 (45%) and 2012 (45%). Separately, eight individual satisfaction factors regarding agency performance were also measured, and correlated with NPS to determine its biggest drivers. The factor that had the largest impact on NPS was trustworthiness and honesty of the agency. In particular, those who agreed with the statement “I believe this staffing agency is trustworthy and honest” gave their agencies a combined NPS of 51%; those who disagreed with that statement gave their agencies a combined NPS of -82%. This result is consistent with those of previous surveys, which also determined trust to be one of the top factors determining NPS. Among temporary workers giving their agency a “10” (the very highest rating), common reasons cited included: outstanding customer service, fast problem resolution, high satisfaction with their placement, and the agency’s ability to find new jobs for them as previous ones ended. Among temporary workers giving their agency a “0” (the very lowest rating), common reasons cited included: poor problem resolution, poor communication including in some cases the inability of agency staff to speak clearly in English, and/or general disorganization and incompetence. Note: Some self-selection bias may be present, as participating firms were incented to participate in the survey in part with the goal of being selected as a “best staffing firm to work for.” However, mitigating the possibility of such bias is the fact that most firms also participated with the intention of simply learning more about how their firm was perceived by its temporary employees. To access the complete report, please select the link below: Satisfaction with staffing agencies (or lack thereof), and what drives it 20160523 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • What Temps Want to Know

    Key Findings: In past temporary worker surveys, respondents have cited the need for improved communications on the part of staffing firms. In the current survey, this was clarified with a follow-up question: “With respect to communications from your staffing agency, on what particular topic would you most like more/better information?” Nearly half of all responses were accounted for in just two specific areas of communication: “feedback about my performance” (23%), and “communication about career development/training options” (22%). The next four most frequent responses were related to specific job placements: “pay and benefits” (16%), “how long an assignment will last” (14%), “what exactly I would be doing in offered jobs” (8%), and “culture of the hiring company I would be placed in” (7%). The latter two communication needs -- “what exactly I would be doing in offered jobs” and “culture of the hiring company I would be placed in” -- were also cited by temporary workers in the previous (2015) survey question regarding what staffing firms could do to help them better succeed in their assignments. The overwhelming majority of temporary workers -- 81% -- said they were receiving adequate communications about job opportunities. To access the complete report, please select the link below: What information should staffing firms do a better job communicating 20160523 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • The Futures of Work

    The Futures of Work produced by Foresight Alliance illuminates global changes and disruptions emerging in the world of work. Their paper encapsulates a year-long study of forecasts for work and workers, supported by a grant from The Rockefeller Foundation.The report takes a futurist perspective, using scenarios and forecasts from thought leaders to explore the boundaries of the possible and synthesize fresh insights, themes, and implications.Four broad themes emerged: Flexible and freelance work structures could speed the destruction of conventional jobs, producing an uncertain mix of insecurity and freedom for workers at every level. Workers in lower-income countries will need new paths to secure livelihoods in the face of these disruptive changes, as prior development models centered around rural work and manufacturing are losing their relevance. Software and robotics will reshape work in nearly every industry and region—eliminating some jobs, complementing human workers in other jobs, and creating entirely new jobs. Whether machines ultimately take work from people or work alongside them, considerable turmoil is highly likely. New structures, from income guarantees to new kinds of asset ownership, are being proposed to help ensure a positive future for workers. The Futures of Work evaluates many of the most prominent ideas. According to the report, workers everywhere will be affected by accelerating changes to the world of work—yet very often, poor and otherwise vulnerable populations are overlooked in discussions of this topic. This report looks deeply at impacts and implications for vulnerable workers.The paper provides a list of the driving forces for the future of work from aging to the youth bulge and the Foresight Alliance’s view of the Gig Economy, which will also be covered in our forthcoming conference.To download the full report, please click below: The-Futures-of-Work-1.12.2016 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • The Futures of Work

    The Futures of Work produce by Foresight Alliance illuminates global changes and disruptions emerging in the world of work. Their paper encapsulates a year-long study of forecasts for work and workers, supported by a grant from The Rockefeller Foundation.The report takes a futurist perspective, using scenarios and forecasts from thought leaders to explore the boundaries of the possible and synthesize fresh insights, themes, and implications.Four broad themes emerged: Flexible and freelance work structures could speed the destruction of conventional jobs, producing an uncertain mix of insecurity and freedom for workers at every level. Workers in lower-income countries will need new paths to secure livelihoods in the face of these disruptive changes, as prior development models centered around rural work and manufacturing are losing their relevance. Software and robotics will reshape work in nearly every industry and region—eliminating some jobs, complementing human workers in other jobs, and creating entirely new jobs. Whether machines ultimately take work from people or work alongside them, considerable turmoil is highly likely. New structures, from income guarantees to new kinds of asset ownership, are being proposed to help ensure a positive future for workers. The Futures of Work evaluates many of the most prominent ideas. According to the report workers everywhere will be affected by accelerating changes to the world of work—yet very often, poor and otherwise vulnerable populations are overlooked in discussions of this topic. This report looks deeply at impacts and implications for vulnerable workers.The paper provides a list of the driving forces for the future of work from aging to the youth bulge and the Foresight Alliance’s view of the Gig Economy, which will also be covered in our forthcoming conference.To download the full report, please click below: The-Futures-of-Work-1.12.2016.pdf 2.54 MB […]

  • Job Board Service Differentiators 2016

    The Job Board industry began in the early 1990s, and moved to the web in the mid-1990s. Since its inception, it has become a standard part of most employers’ recruiting tool kit. But what makes one job board service different from another? Is it simply site traffic, services offered, or are there other differentiators as well?This report will discuss the core features of Job Boards based on our analysis of the largest globally, and then delve into the additional services and features that differentiate one site from another. We will then examine what types of extended services may be useful to a particular employer – and why.Finally, we will look at performance metrics, services, and targeted market segments for the largest job board brands – sites that span the globe and most major employment markets. In doing so, we will provide you with insight into how this critical recruiting tool works, and how you can make the most informed buying decision for your organization.Much of the data in this report is derived from a survey conducted among the world’s largest Job Boards between March and April 2016. We believe this report is the first analysis of its kind. Job Board Service Differentiators 20160513.pdf 722.51 kB […]

  • MSP Market Developments and Differentiators: Part 1

    This report identifies vendors who are actively investing and developing their MSP services. In addition, this report has identified the development of MSP service offerings in the market. Key findings include: The nature of MSP SOW management is expanding to include strategy consulting assignments as well as large service contracts covering $50m annualised spend. For one client, ~66% of the contracts in the SOW program were deliverable based. Services are becoming more sophisticated in SOW and providers are investing in senior procurement specialists who have direct RfX management experience. Services are moving from a supplier management focus to predictive sourcing, supported by investments in analytics. Approximately 50% of MSP vendors are currently investing in analytics. Supplier services are not limited to the management of staffing suppliers, but increasingly FMS platform integration as well as worker tracking solutions. US based MSP vendors are showing the greatest evidence of an uptake in FMS services being embedded in an MSP supply base. As HR takes a greater role in managing CW programs there are growing investments among many MSP’s in talent consulting teams to complement traditional MSP services offerings. There is evidence of Preferred Supplier List (PSL) sourcing strategies moving to direct sourcing models to achieve greater cost efficiencies and offer a higher touch candidate service as delivered by Contingent RPO programs. These are being seen in digital, IT and social care skills categories where supply is particularly tight. Healthcare specialist vendors have the deepest evidence of Total Talent Acquisition solutions being embedded in MSP services as they look to support the entire business function with workforce planning and scheduling processes and best practises across both the contingent and direct hire (permanent) workforces. Of the vendors researched, 65% of these also offer RPO solutions as a complementary offering and selection of clients are being supported with an RPO and Contingent RPO blended offering. Approximately 35% of vendors are also offering proprietary VMS technology and continue to develop products to support the MSP service. Some have built-in SLA’s to support service reporting. While most of these providers also partner with best of breed VMS technologies, the ability to offer their own technology can create a distinct advantage. SIA recognizes three distinct evolutionary waves of MSP services: Wave 1.0: Sourcing Leveraging Scale Wave 2.0: Sourcing through Vendor Neutral Models Wave 3.0: Sourcing for Work (Emerging) Click the link below to download the report:  MSP Market Developments Part 1 20160504 FINALdocx.pdf 2.48 MB […]

  • Global Staffing Market Forecast 2016

    Introduction SIA forecasts that the global staffing market worth $409 billion (€369 billion) in 2015 will grow 5% in 2016 on a constant currency basis. This is partly based on IMF forecasts of 2016 GDP remaining at the same level as 2015, i.e. 2.4%. Fifteen countries represent 89% of global staffing revenue. Of these, we predict that China and Italy will see the strongest growth and Brazil the weakest. Please note we define “staffing” revenue as revenue generated from the provision of temporary workers to business clients, as well as from “place & search” services (direct hire/permanent placement and retained search.) This report is an update on our previous 2016 forecasts published in December 2015. Since this previous report, we have downgraded our global forecast for 2016 from 7% to 5% based on weaker economic data with slower growth estimates for Brazil, Canada, Germany, Italy, Japan and UK. Only one market has been revised upwards from our original 2016 forecast; the Netherlands which has been revised from +5% to +6%. To download the full report, click below Global Staffing Market Forecast 2016.pdf 563.31 kB […]

  • The Futures of Work

    The Futures of Work produce by Foresight Alliance illuminates global changes and disruptions emerging in the world of work. Their paper encapsulates a year-long study of forecasts for work and workers, supported by a grant from The Rockefeller Foundation.The report takes a futurist perspective, using scenarios and forecasts from thought leaders to explore the boundaries of the possible and synthesize fresh insights, themes, and implications.Four broad themes emerged: Flexible and freelance work structures could speed the destruction of conventional jobs, producing an uncertain mix of insecurity and freedom for workers at every level. Workers in lower-income countries will need new paths to secure livelihoods in the face of these disruptive changes, as prior development models centered around rural work and manufacturing are losing their relevance. Software and robotics will reshape work in nearly every industry and region—eliminating some jobs, complementing human workers in other jobs, and creating entirely new jobs. Whether machines ultimately take work from people or work alongside them, considerable turmoil is highly likely. New structures, from income guarantees to new kinds of asset ownership, are being proposed to help ensure a positive future for workers. The Futures of Work evaluates many of the most prominent ideas. According to the report workers everywhere will be affected by accelerating changes to the world of work—yet very often, poor and otherwise vulnerable populations are overlooked in discussions of this topic. This report looks deeply at impacts and implications for vulnerable workers.The paper provides a list of the driving forces for the future of work from aging to the youth bulge and the Foresight Alliance’s view of the Gig Economy, which will also be covered in our forthcoming conference.To download the full report, please click below: The-Futures-of-Work-1.12.2016 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • Job Board Service Differentiators 2016

    The Job Board industry began in the early 1990s, and moved to the web in the mid-1990s. Since its inception, it has become a standard part of most employers’ recruiting tool kit. But what makes one job board service different from another? Is it simply site traffic, services offered, or are there other differentiators as well?This report will discuss the core features of Job Boards based on our analysis of the largest globally, and then delve into the additional services and features that differentiate one site from another. We will then examine what types of extended services may be useful to a particular employer – and why.Finally, we will look at performance metrics, services, and targeted market segments for the largest job board brands – sites that span the globe and most major employment markets. In doing so, we will provide you with insight into how this critical recruiting tool works, and how you can make the most informed buying decision for your organization.Much of the data in this report is derived from a survey conducted among the world’s largest Job Boards between March and April 2016. We believe this report is the first analysis of its kind. Job Board Service Differentiators 20160513 - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • MSP Market Developments and Differentiators: Part 1

    This report identifies vendors who are actively investing and developing their MSP services. In addition, this report has identified the development of MSP service offerings in the market. Key findings include: The nature of MSP SOW management is expanding to include strategy consulting assignments as well as large service contracts covering $50m annualised spend. For one client, ~66% of the contracts in the SOW program were deliverable based. Services are becoming more sophisticated in SOW and providers are investing in senior procurement specialists who have direct RfX management experience. Services are moving from a supplier management focus to predictive sourcing, supported by investments in analytics. Approximately 50% of MSP vendors are currently investing in analytics. Supplier services are not limited to the management of staffing suppliers, but increasingly FMS platform integration as well as worker tracking solutions. US based MSP vendors are showing the greatest evidence of an uptake in FMS services being embedded in an MSP supply base. As HR takes a greater role in managing CW programs there are growing investments among many MSP’s in talent consulting teams to complement traditional MSP services offerings. There is evidence of Preferred Supplier List (PSL) sourcing strategies moving to direct sourcing models to achieve greater cost efficiencies and offer a higher touch candidate service as delivered by Contingent RPO programs. These are being seen in digital, IT and social care skills categories where supply is particularly tight. Healthcare specialist vendors have the deepest evidence of Total Talent Acquisition solutions being embedded in MSP services as they look to support the entire business function with workforce planning and scheduling processes and best practises across both the contingent and direct hire (permanent) workforces. Of the vendors researched, 65% of these also offer RPO solutions as a complementary offering and selection of clients are being supported with an RPO and Contingent RPO blended offering. Approximately 35% of vendors are also offering proprietary VMS technology and continue to develop products to support the MSP service. Some have built-in SLA’s to support service reporting. While most of these providers also partner with best of breed VMS technologies, the ability to offer their own technology can create a distinct advantage. SIA recognizes three distinct evolutionary waves of MSP services: Wave 1.0: Sourcing Leveraging Scale Wave 2.0: Sourcing through Vendor Neutral Models Wave 3.0: Sourcing for Work (Emerging) Click the link below to download the report:  MSP Market Developments Part 1 20160504 FINALdocx - You do not have permission to view this object. […]

  • A Look At the Workforce Environment in India

    Key Findings: India is the world’s largest democracy with almost 1.3 billion people, and its economy has seen significant recent growth to become the seventh largest by GDP in 2015, according to the World Bank. There is considerable segmentation in the labour market in terms of forms of employment, sector, location, region, gender, caste, religion, tribe, etc. The labour force to population ratio is lower than average at 56% compared to nearly 64% for the rest of the world. India’s workforce is overwhelmingly (92%) engaged in informal employment with low wages and little or no access to social protections (i.e. home-based work, self-employment, employment in household enterprises, small units, on land as agricultural workers, labour on construction sites, domestic work, and a myriad other forms of casual or temporary employment). Of those working in the organised sector, less than 8% have regular, full-time employment with social protection. Challenges for India’s labour market include under-employment, particularly of young graduates, and an expanding population, not matched with appropriate job opportunities; it is estimated India’s labour force will be greater than that of China by 2030. There is a real concern this will lead to increased migration overseas. SIA estimated that the Indian staffing market was worth USD 5 billion in 2012, and that the penetration rate (temporary agency workers as a proportion of the total workforce) was 0.3%. Flexi-staff can be categorized into 3 types: professional; general white collar; and general blue collar. The Indian Staffing Federation (ISF), predicts that the flexi-staffing industry may account for more than 10% of India’s formal sector employment by 2025.  To download a copy of this report click below: A Look At Workforce Environment_India_050416 - You do not have permission to view this object. Separately, Staffing Industry Analysts has also developed an Excel-based Pricing and Margin Assessment tool, which is available to CWS Council Members. The tool is an attempt to help end-users of temporary workers (i.e. Client companies) better understand how the statutory and discretionary elements (i.e. benefits) impact the cost structures and profitability of a temporary agency. The cost components included in the tool can vary based on a number of factors, such as changes to employment laws or the size and type of temporary agency.CWS Council Members who are interested in learning more about this useful tool should contact their Staffing Industry Analysts client service representative, who can share the tool and schedule time to explain how the tool works.&nbs […]